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Tough Love: How To Make A Comic

Journal Entry: Sun May 18, 2014, 6:53 PM



Or Decide You Don't Want To After All.

I've seen comic how-to-get-started guides before, and they're all so ninny-nippled they word it like anyone can make a comic, wow, so magical and fun!

Wrong.  Everyone and their pet dog has a "story" they want to "write" or "make a comic of."  Face it, it ain't gonna happen for 99% of us.  You gotta have self-discipline and stubbornness to get anything done.  And you can't just avoid the stuff that sounds too hard.  It's a package deal.

1.  Having a character doesn't mean you've done anything.  Maybe you've spent a year deciding on the perfect hairstyle and three years before that developing his complex personality, and technically, you spent the entirety of your high school career on him too, since he's a "redesign" of an old fancharacter--who cares!  Making characters doesn't take years.  In fact, you're hurting your story by keeping characters around for that long, because you start letting sentiment override what's best for the story. 

But nay, says you, I killed my character! I pulled out his teeth and impoverished him and made him watch MLP, I'm MEAN to my characters!  That's not the sentiment I'm talking about.  I'm talking, would you cut him out of the story if the plot would be better off?

Only add characters when you have a role to fill, and dispose of them when they're not needed.

Saying "I want to write a comic, and I already have a cast" is like saying "I want to paint a portrait of every person alive in Houston, and I already bought a canvas."

2.  Stand-alone illustrations.  Give them a rest.  All the energy you spend on those can be put toward pages instead.  And isn't that what you want to end up with?

3.  Pick an ending.  Then pick the single event that set your protagonist toward that ending.  And now you have Point A and Point B, write between them and you have your story.  Which, again, is what you wanted, right?  So no more whining that "your story/script isn't done."  Make decisions.  Make sacrifices.  Move on.

And I know this part is probably one of the hardest, most time-consuming steps of all, I really do, but there does come a point when complaining that "it's difficult" starts to sound a lot like ass-dragging.

Accept that your project is never going to be the perfect, emotional headscene you imagine.  No one's project is perfect.  Not even your favorite webcomic or TV show or whatever.  They all have flaws and plotholes, too, and the writers know it.  But aren't you glad they made something anyway?

4.  So you got started and you finished a page!  Hooray!  Now shut up because it's not that big of a goddamn deal to do one measly page that'll take a few seconds to read.  Immediately stopping to celebrate after every page--and by "celebrate" I mean posting to get that sweet, sweet feedback--is a waste of time.  Do you want a comic, or do you want a "like"?  Then get started on the next page.  Do not rely on the approval of readers to motivate you.  It helps and it's great, but if that's the only reason you're making the comic, you're going to be very disappointed.

5.  You're going to update once a week?  Okay, say you go an entire year without missing a single week (impressive!)--you've got... 52 whole pages!  Wow, a chapter and a half!  How long is your project, again?

6.  "I'm too busy to draw more pages than that!"  Well then, you need to find a faster way to work.  If you're a slow worker and you've already decided that's a fact of life you can't ever change, maybe you don't really want a comic.

7.  If your project is over three years old and you're no closer to its completion because you keep changing this or redoing that, the horse that you are currently beating died in utero.

8.  So you got started, you're drawing pages fast, you're making decisions and trimming fat left and right.  This sucks, you cry!  This is labor, it's horrible, I can't bear to do another panel!  YEP~ congratulations, that's what it feels like.  You can whine, as long as you keep working and pushing through the days you'd rather be drawing something else. 

I call it Week Two Syndrome, like from NaNoWriMo--that dead-time you have no motivation for the project that dooms most of them to incompletion.  You just can't give up.  There's no easy way to overcome it and no simpler way to put it.  You work every day, even if it's only a little, and it will become fun again eventually.

9.  So now you're having a mental breakdown because you start second-guessing character motivations and plot points... actually, I don't have any advice for countering this one.  Good luck!

Moral of the story: making comics is a real sack-nibbler most of the time.  If you can't deal with the difficult stuff, you're better off investing your time in something else.


Add a Comment:
 
:iconmr-dewiitt:
MR-DEWiiTT Featured By Owner Edited Jun 22, 2015  Hobbyist Artist
This is great advice to those who want to start on comics, but I just don't agree on how you can't create characters before plotting a story. Most have different methods, but I find it great to start off with a set of characters. Creating characters usually give you a story you can start developing on, putting them in different situations. Also, drawing stand alone illustrations usually start giving you ideas of developing the characters and writing new stories as the plot goes on.
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:iconjadehawke:
JadeHawke Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2015
I saved this to my favorites because every once in a while I need a kick in the pants to get going again and this pretty much does the trick. I basically say to myself, "Is it just a fun fantasy, or are you really going to do it?" Thanks for some much needed tough love
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:iconshizuru1412:
Shizuru1412 Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2014
Thankfully I'm doing 4 koma sol thing, yay! :iconcatlaplz:

And since you're quoting nanos:

I do nanowrimo too, finished over 50k novels.
And if you don't even start writing, the novel won't ever be done, same with making a freaking manga.
There's a clear difference between hobbyist and making manga for a job, as what your articles seemingly about.

Well, you'll never know unless you try, I guess?
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:iconzomickschallahrecipe:
zomickschallahrecipe Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Great advice! Thanks :D
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:iconjenifferlee:
jenifferlee Featured By Owner May 30, 2014  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
This is great advice! We all need a little bit of tough love sometimes.
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:iconquietrium:
Quietrium Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Student General Artist
I'm not ready to make a full-comic. Heh, probably will try to keep it condensed to about 50 pages maximum. But I can probably do that, especially with Summer coming up. Lots of free time on my hands.

I only have one criticism about this: you say its how to make a comic. Really, you're just pointing out what you should have, not how you 
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:iconcoca-coia:
Coca-CoIa Featured By Owner May 25, 2014
I looked at the title fast and thought it said "how to make love" //shot
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:iconphaserw0lf:
phaserW0lf Featured By Owner May 25, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
High five,
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:iconangati:
Angati Featured By Owner May 25, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Thank you for the advice! I can't tell you how many times I had redone a page because it wasn't "perfect". It annoys me to NO END. Your advice though tells me that it's not gonna be perfect and that's okay. Thanks for the advice :)
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:iconsybilx:
SybilX Featured By Owner May 25, 2014
Nevermind... Too hard.
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:icononepiecefan15:
onepiecefan15 Featured By Owner May 25, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
'Make sure to have fun, and if it don't look fun, id suggest you place somthing fun in there if you find your comic quite boring. '
'Even the mood you are in while making this comic can damage the outcome of the comic.'
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:iconsigfriedofgaea:
Sigfriedofgaea Featured By Owner May 25, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Nice advice. :)
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:iconcicienixa:
CiciEnixa Featured By Owner May 25, 2014   Digital Artist
Thank you very much for this. I've only started and it already feels like it's going to be painful. Then again, I already knew that was the agony I would put myself through when I decided on making it a reality. So yeah. I might see this as a waste of time after a couple of years, but I know I'll still look back at it, tell myself it's a horrible piece of S, but it's a horrible piece of S that I put my heart and soul into.
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:iconalikat980:
Alikat980 Featured By Owner May 25, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Great advice. I already hated making comics, just because the process of making panels was a turn off. But this made me realize that, comics are hell to make. I'll just stick with regular drawings, thank you.
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:iconmegatombax:
megatombax Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
This was great advice for me, personally. I finally realize how distracted I've been, and in fear of failure. But as for my main story itself, I'm gonna get back to it. I personally feel as if I've had a bunch of smaller projects in order to further prepare me for something I didn't need that type of preparation for, and realistically, there are projects that I might have to abandon, if it means I'M doing what I really want to do (and not getting caught up by all the distractions waver my feelings).
 
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:iconshelilla:
Shelilla Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
SO true
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:iconlordshitpissfart123:
LordShitpissfart123 Featured By Owner May 24, 2014
This. All of this.
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:iconallyrat:
AllyRat Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
This is true in so many ways.
Even my failing, written-by-a-13-year-old, has had the same boring characters for 3 years comic could have been alot better if I'd read this when I was 11 and I'd had the common sense never to have wanted to write a comic in the first place.  hehe.
Even if it is just a comedic comic about 4 teenagers doing random stuff.


This guide made me look at all of my comics and want to burn them, and at the same time create an actual comic with an amazing adventure and a storyline where the characters go off and do stuff and don't just sit at home and twice a week do something like play that new videogame or wtch a TV show.


I think i shall do neither.
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:iconmalifestix1:
Malifestix1 Featured By Owner May 23, 2014
Some other advice I might give is that you do need a story, wel no duh! And thinking of a story is hard. Now some people think that a story line should be long to really capture people's attention, but sadly no. Not everything has to be a "Witch and the Hundred Knight." Planning from point A to B is good but if you want a good look at making this story. Write it out! Not a book, but what happens in each page. Ex: John pushed Bon downstairs, and yelled "I don't give a da** about what you have to say about our race!" Then he pounced, claws extended, from atop the stairs snarling, and tore bob to shreds.
then that can give you a visual of what it might look like in comic then draw that out. Now they can also be like; John pushed Bob downstairs. John yelled I don't give a da** about what you have to say about our race!," John pounces, tears bob to shreds.
because I still get the visual effect.

basically it makes it easier to picture it which makes it easier to draw it out as a comic. ^^
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:iconmegatombax:
megatombax Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I totally agree with your point! That makes me want to get to work; this instant! :D
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:iconslendersummerseve:
SLenDErsUMmeRSevE Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for giving the truth, even though it hurts a little :)
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:iconprofessordoctorc:
ProfessorDoctorC Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
My problem with this is that it basically amounts to "if you think you'll fail or give up, you shouldn't try" which to me seems terrible advice. So what if someone is not cut out for drawing comics and gives up after a couple of months? Their work will be inconsequential, but it's not like that harms anyone. The easiest way to figure out if you're good at something is to try and do it. Besides, most people draw as a hobby, so basically this amounts to saying that they should quit their hobby unless they're willing to make it into their job.
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:iconydt81:
ydt81 Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2014
My thoughts exactly. I loved the wake-up call of this message but I do think good advice is not about telling people what you know so much as what you *wish* you'd known. There's no real harm in learning a lesson for yourself. Conversely, I think, advice that discourages experience can be dangerous, especially when distributed so vastly.
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:icon0dddity:
0dddity Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Student General Artist
I get what you're saying, but I think the writer of this was saying that you should do it to save yourself some time and effort.
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:iconprofessordoctorc:
ProfessorDoctorC Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
And use it for what? Most people who try to draw comics like drawing comics, so it wouldn't be wasted time even if the whole project failed.
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:icon0dddity:
0dddity Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Student General Artist
I'm not sure what they'd use it for, but I'd use it to do something like practice anatomy, or perspective or other drawing skills. 
And it's true it wouldn't be wasted, it'd give them some experience with comics. 
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:iconprofessordoctorc:
ProfessorDoctorC Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Exactly. At least if you try and fail you gain some experience for the future. My problem was that the journal suggested to give up without even trying.
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:iconjazzlassie6020:
JazzLassie6020 Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
judging from the above, no I don't think I'm ready to make a commitment to a full-fledged comic... which is why I will get started on something anyway :iconlaughingplz: 

Point is, I'm not ready to make tonnes of pages for a very long time, partly because of life commitments, but also because I'm just not a fast illustrator yet. It takes practice to get there, and this doujin will be my practice thing :) Also because I can't wait to get this story out of my head and onto paper. 

BUT, great wake up call and thank you for the advanced notice for what I will be facing :3 
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:iconnemesisprime91:
Nemesisprime91 Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Student Writer
This is all well and good for people who can illustrate and draw, but what about those who can't do either of those? I can't draw to save my life, however, I'm a writer, amateur at best. What would you recommend I do to get into comic book writing?
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:iconf-y-r-e-f-l-y:
F-y-r-e-f-l-y Featured By Owner May 23, 2014
Try making a story board of said comic, just filling in the pannels by discribing what would be drawn there. Then try and find an artist who will draw it for you and make then read this c:
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:icondtriel:
DTRiel Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm not ready. Thank you~
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:icontoddntheshiningsword:
ToddNTheShiningSword Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I agree with this article in ALL OF the general points, but disagree with all of the details. Every single thing you recommended not doing so accurately describes me it's as if you wrote this article ABOUT ME, and yet I managed to get my comic all the way to 250 pages over 2 years and am still working on it. (It's actually 125 pages, but they're all double length pages).

I started with the beloved character who I actually developed EXACTLY THE WAY YOU DESCRIBED, and I had actually spent a year working on one character's hair before putting them into the story. 
I have an upcoming story with a full cast of characters but haven't written the story yet.
I make all my comics to please others and not myself. I make my comic for my readers, not for me, and I know for a fact that if it was just for me I'd get bored and stop doing it. I'm completely reliant on the approval of readers to keep writing.
I also need the constant feedback because I like to keep repeating the same kind of thing many times- like when you tell a running joke, for example- so if I don't get feedback I'm going to end up forcing a bad idea down my readers' throats until they choke on it.

I don't even have the point A & point B! I've made 250 pages of comics- and planned out much, much more, and I still am very confused as to how this story began and have no idea how it ends. 
I've heard it said in school and life that telling the beginning and end of a story are easy, and the hard part is all the stuff in the middle. That's not me, or my philosophy. My approach is to write all the middle scenes first, then look at them and figure out how that story could have bean or ended. Too bad I've failed to figure out my beginning or end, BUT I've written a fun story along the way!
I'm not a professional though, so this is probably different for pros...
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:iconoly-rrr:
Oly-RRR Featured By Owner May 22, 2014  Professional General Artist
I've been doing comics for a while now, a couple professionally, most of them just for fun, and this guide is spot-on except for one thing... there's no "you're better off investing your time in something else". If you want to make a comic - do it. It doesn't matter if you don't post regularly, it doesn't matter if there's stuff that's not perfect. Life is too short to be too scared to do something just because you're not "badass" enough to post a page every week. It's a bit sad there's this whole culture shaming people for doing something they love not fast enough.

I don't post comics every week, I don't cry about, I don't feel horrible, I actually enjoy a lot of the process and you know what? It feels great. Life's too short and has too much bad stuff in it to make things you love painful as well just because you want to be the coolest little webcomic artist in the street. But that's just my opinion. :)
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:icontoddntheshiningsword:
ToddNTheShiningSword Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow! What comic did you make professionally? That's cool!

The point I took from the "you're better off investing your time in something else" part- and this article as a whole- is that... most people don't want to make a comic as badly as they think they do. They end up wasting time of their life on something they don't have the passion for, when there was something they were passionate about they could have done instead.

I think this article is about telling people that comic-making isn't for everyone. It is only for people who are willing to put work into it. The work doesn't have to be excrutiating, but anyone who isn't willing to do it is just going to make a big dream, make three pages, realize their dream is unachievable and quit, lol. All that time planning for nothing. People have super unrealistic expectations for how successful their comics will be and how much work they'll require.
It think making comics can be like making animation. You have to have lots of patience and a long term ability to see a project through, or instead of getting that big result you wanted, you're just going to have a barely-started mess you made before you gave up and quit.

I think half the young artists in the world dream of going to Japan right now to become the next great manga artist, and a purpose of this is to give them a reality check.

Not all artists are comic book artists. Some are made for other things. :)
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:iconoly-rrr:
Oly-RRR Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Professional General Artist
Stuff for local advertisement and children's magazines, I'm not in the US so none of it is widely-known (one of my shorts was for a local branch of Egmont, but again, only Europeans know what it is). I wouldn't want to work professionally on a big series anyway for multiple reasons. I draw comics more or less constantly but most of it is for fun these days.

Oh yeah, I know the kind of young artists you're talking about. But honestly I think I'd rather them try to draw three pages and fail than scare them of with a journal about how they are going to hate every moment of their existence if they give it a try. Comics are often hard work but 90% of people I've ever heard talking about their work love it for this reason or another.

I can think of a lot of people who couldn't work much on their comic because their workload was too big at the time - but they still thought about their ideas and developed them at the speed they could and that didn't make it a "dead horse". Everyone is different, has different speed and different idea of what they want.

Besides nobody is "made" for anything - or at least it's up for them to decide, not some bullying journal called "tough love". There is a guy out there who draws badass comics holding a pen is his mouth (Larime Taylor, look him up) - I really don't think he's going it to punish himself. ;) And I think that if you do want to put a journal out there, a journal that will make people feel good and try something new is way better than a journal that makes young artists too intimidated to try.
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:icontoddntheshiningsword:
ToddNTheShiningSword Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I hope this one isn't too long! I cut a long rant out of it!:blahblah:

The problem though is that young artists have heard too much positive, and have developed such an unrealistic view of comic making that they literally don't even understand that making one comic book takes more work than making a single, on-off picture does. They put one page up and don't understand why hundreds of people aren't clamoring for the next page, and they make 3 pages and wonder why they don't have 100 Comments a page. They make one more page, get frustrated over the fact that they still don't have a Daily Deviation, and give up... and they learn nothing from their experience, because they still can't see why the big artists get tens of thousands of views per page and they don't. They never, ever realized that hard work was necessary.

Well, most artists set their expectations a little lower than that, but...
So many young artists are on the internet and whiny because nobody told them about the hard work part, or the practice part, or the planning part or the study part. Or even an art school part. Their mommies just told them all their art was so lovely and that they could make whatever they wanted and be amazing. They never even got a critique before, and probably can't take one.
People need to hear that just because your mommy says your little picture is beautiful doesn't mean you have everything you need to move to Japan next year and become the next great manga artist.

People you've known who succeeded did it because they had the passion and put in the work. People need to hear about the work art requires because that message just doesn't get out there. Kids don't hear about the work, and laypeople don't hear about all the work art is either. People don't hear about how much work good art takes. And this journal isn't telling people what they can or can't do. It's telling people what kind of work making a comic takes, explaining why the great comic artists are so great, and how to tell if you're not cut out for comics long before your feelings get hurt.
People who have what it takes are going to read this and roll up their sleeves. People who don't are going follow their passion elsewhere, since there's probably something else they're more passionate about anyway that they could be doing.

It's easy to look at discouraging words as words to ignore, but not always. When words are too positive, they become lies, because they butter you up and inflate your ego by deliberately hiding the truth whenever it's something they don't think you want to hear, because they're afraid that if you know the truth about the hard parts, you'll be too scared to try, and that's how people end up thinking they can succeed at art without even doing any work. You don't have to make a feel good journal, because there's too much of that for many young artists. You have to encourage little children or they'll give up, so families and teachers have told them so many good things about their abilities that particular parts of their egos are too inflated. I know this happened to me, and I'm not the only artist this happened to. People just need to learn that your art becomes good because of hard work. It is not automatically good just because you're special. You're special to your family, but you won't be special to strangers.
If people had told me more when I was in middle and high school about the hard parts of life, I would have been better prepared to face them, and would have made better choices.

I don't really think this is that serious though. :XD: I really think people just need to know how much work comic-making is, and they really, really don't!
I personally think it's better, too, if people simply try it and find out they don't like it, but some people actually put about half as much thought and heart behind their 3 pages of FAIL as this Journal suggests, and for anyone who thought way too much about the comic idea they had but never had the passion to follow through... quitting now might be a good idea. I know that by experience. When I was in high school, I spent WAY TOO MUCH time on a comic that never made it past page 15. If I'd spent that time doing homework instead, I would have gotten a higher grade point average. I forsook homework- and other forms of art- for comics, and the wasted time didn't pay off. If someone had provided me with a way of knowing that I'd be better off doing something else, I would have been better off.
Years later, though, in 2011, I picked comic-making back up! :D
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:iconoly-rrr:
Oly-RRR Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Professional General Artist
I find unexpected long comments slightly troublesome but I did read what you wrote. :)

Everyone has different life experiences. You and me certainly do. :) When I was growing up I kept hearing that drawing cartoons is not a profession, that one can't earn money like that and that I will never amount to anything from most adults I've encountered, including teachers and parents. I certainly don't need more of that online. Some people need a punch in the teeth, most people don't and it's not a reason to punch everyone you meet in the teeth just because someone might need it, to put it metaphorically. ;) Life teaches people to have realistic expectations but when certain people decide it's their "mission" to teach everyone that life is hard they usually don't look very appealing...

Besides, this journal isn't that much about hard work - it's more about how to learn to hate something you intended to do for joy. Nobody needs a lesson like that.
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:icontoddntheshiningsword:
ToddNTheShiningSword Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow. Adults actually told you that? Even when you were little? What kind of adult tells their child they'll never amount to anything? :omg: Well, you said most adults, and not all of them, but still. wow
But for older kids, like teenagers, it would make sense because you want them to make money. :shrug:
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:iconoly-rrr:
Oly-RRR Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Professional General Artist
Yeah. I dunno if it's just my particular circumstances or if it's true for most people growing up outside of the US - Hollywood films do seem to be either about "being the best of the best of the best" and becoming a president or about being proud of your job when you didn't become a president after all and work sweeping floors. :P

When I was maybe 11 or 12 and drew mostly cartoon animals my parents told me to "either start learning to draw properly or stop wasting paper". I guess that was a good advice but trust me, a lot of things I heard before and after that didn't do anything besides damaging my self-esteem. I see a lot of people who don't do any personal art because they are burned out by school or work. Lazy people who don't know what hard work is won't get in the industry anyway, you shouldn't worry about that. But if someone wants to draw a 3 page comic with no ending in their free time there's no reason to shame them about it. :)
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:icontoddntheshiningsword:
ToddNTheShiningSword Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Wow.
It's sad to hear your parents told you that. I hope you're secretly exaggerating a little.

You're right... lazy people WON'T ever get into the art industry. I should have thought about that.
Still, I don't think it would hurt for people to simply hear beforehand that making a comic is really hard, so that way they'll know, especially if it's an idea they've been nursing for a long time. If they've had the idea and the dream for a long time, it could be nice to bluntly hear how difficult it can be and know what to do so they can make their dream a reality, rather than dive in with ignorance. Hearing it meanly can make the message sink in more. But people who weren't nursing an idea for years before starting, it would be so much better for them to just skip reading this Journal and it's tough love and just make the 3 pager and fail. I think you're right about that.
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(1 Reply)
:icontoddntheshiningsword:
ToddNTheShiningSword Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I should have replied to this one when I replied to your other message, because I had this one in my head for days!

It was the part about Hollywood depictions that got me thinking. I hate to act like Americans know something no one else does, so I wanted to ask you how much you feel other countries have that message? That Hollywood theme is very close to American reality. Obviously, not everyone does their best, many fail and lots of people turn to crime and whatnot, but the American value is just like that, except one type was missing from what you said.
In America, you are're either supposed to be the best in the world, or you're supposed to not be, but take great pride in what you do, just like the films put forth. The person to add though, is if you're not proud of where you are, than you are supposed to be furiously clawing your way to a higher spot. They try to beat these ideas into your head at every school or other learning institution (gyms, sports teams, seminars, everything) when you are young that you must have to be like that if you want to be succeed, but schools often leave out the just-being-happy-with-what-you-do part. I feel like, to put it EXTREMELY short- that's how America became great. Putting those ideas forth back when other countries all had kingdoms and everything was determined by birth. But I want to believe that other countries are not inferior now and have gotten the ideas like that.

But what does that look like from your view, outside of America?:earth:
WAIT. You ARE from outside America, right? :omg: I assumed you were from Europe based on your art, and just my personal assumptions, for some reason... :stupidme: and on what you said!
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(1 Reply)
:icontoddntheshiningsword:
ToddNTheShiningSword Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Sorry my Reply was too long.
I try to leave detailed replies to longer messages, and only leave ones like that for places like this. Try as I might, I can never leave a message shorter than the one I got. :doh: Except now. ^^;
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:iconoly-rrr:
Oly-RRR Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Professional General Artist
I used to be the same way. Actually it was writing comics that taught me to express my thoughts the shortest way possible - you never get much extra room with speech bubbles. :) I guess I have issues with text walls mostly because they always look like rants even if you phrase them very politely and are sometimes hard to get through (late night conversations about mutually interesting themes are an exception, I guess).
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:icontoddntheshiningsword:
ToddNTheShiningSword Featured By Owner May 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah, but for me that ends up being simply not expressing my thoughts completely at all, and just leaving half of what I was going to say completely out, then running the risk of someone calling me out for something I didn't say, when the only reason I didn't say it was because I didn't want my message to be too long.

And in comics I just end up making an extra page or something then to get enough room for enough pictures to go with the text if I need it all.
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:iconawkwardmage:
AwkwardMage Featured By Owner May 22, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Heck dude. I totally agree.
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:iconzazypoo:
zazypoo Featured By Owner May 22, 2014
my cousin draws comics for a living, i now know what she goes through
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:iconoriginalaaron:
OriginalAaron Featured By Owner May 22, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
This was helpful, motivating and hurtful all at the same time. I LIKE IT!
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:iconbloodyhannah:
bloodyhannah Featured By Owner May 22, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
I went into this quite skeptical but after fully reading it, you clearly know what the hell you're talking about. I applaud you. Every point you made about building self discipline, doing it not for feedback and rewards, and comparing it to nanowrimo is all spot on.
As someone who is working on a comic right now I wish you luck on your work.
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:iconaochiro:
Aochiro Featured By Owner May 22, 2014  Student
What is up with you and your guides?
You have such good pointers and such an honest disposition, it's amazing how people are reacting to them. XD
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:iconsquidlifecrisis:
squidlifecrisis Featured By Owner May 22, 2014   Digital Artist
ISN'T IT
 I sure know how to reel in some grade-A whiners :iconteheplz:
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